Erectile and Ejaculation Issues

Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

I specialize in identifying how your erectile dysfunction developed, so we can most effectively reduce or eliminate ED symptoms and restore confidence and pleasure in your sex life. While it’s not possible to provide any guarantees, in many cases, men often see significant improvement within 2-4 sessions. Beth also incorporates the latest research in pelvic floor health into her treatment approach.

Not being able to get or maintain an erection can be devastating for men and their partners. Sometimes, an exam by a physician is recommended as part of the treatment process. Although there are highly effective medications for ED, some men cannot take these medications, and others may still not be getting the results that they want. The causes of ED are often complex. Some of the most common reasons ED develops include:

Anxiety

Relationship Issues

Medical Issues or Medications

Lack of Sexual Knowledge

Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors, such as Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis, help to relax the smooth muscles of the penis, thus allowing more blood flow and a firmer erection. When they are prescribed, however, doctors often do not address issues critical to treatment success including, “restarting a sexual life after an extended period of abstinence, partner resistance, partner concerns or dysfunction, lack of confidence, performance anxiety, and unrealistic expectations” (Althof, p. 7). Beth can provide education and eroticism-building strategies to both the person taking the PDE-5 inhibitor as well as his partner.

Sometimes when men have a few sexual experiences in which they lost or could not get an erection, they subsequently are very anxious about being sexual due to fear of it happening again. This fear can then cause the loss of erections. The man can now be stuck in a cycle in which fear causes a loss-of-erection which causes more fear which causes loss-of-erection… Beth can often greatly help the individual in these situations by teaching him (or him and his partner) strategies to unwire the anxiety so that the cycle is broken, and the sexual experience can be enjoyable again.

Reference
Althof, S. (2010). What’s new in sex therapy. Journal of Sex Medicine, 7, 5-13.

Premature Ejaculation (PE)
or Rapid/Early Ejaculation

Premature ejaculation, now more often called rapid ejaculation or early ejaculation, can be a very frustrating issue. The DSM-IV-TR defines PE as “persistent or recurrent ejaculation with minimal sexual stimulation before, on, or shortly after penetration and before the person wishes it” (p. 554). Beth completes a thorough psychotherapy assessment so that a treatment plan can be customized that best addresses the issue. The relevance of pelvic floor health to erectile and ejaculatory issues is now better understood. Beth incorporates the latest knowledge/research of pelvic floor health in her treatment approach. Many men who engage in the treatment program see significant improvement within 2-4 sessions.

Although the time it takes men to ejaculate varies by each individual, by country and by other factors, Waldinger, Quinn, and Dilleen (2005), found in their study of 500 couples from 5 countries that the overall median value of Intravaginal Ejaculation Latency Time (IELT) was 5.4 minutes. There are multiple factors that can contribute to Early Ejaculation, including new sexual partners, anxiety, pelvic floor dysfunction, medical/hormonal issues, neurobiological contributors, relationship problems, lack of body awareness, and previous traumas. Sometimes, an exam by a physician is recommended as part of the treatment process. Beth provides psychosexual education, cognitive strategies, behavioral exercises, and solution-focused options.

References
American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (Revised 4th ed.). Washington, DC.

Waldinger, M., Quinn, P.,Dilleen, M., Mundayat R., Schweitzer, D., Boolell M. (2005). Ejaculation disorders: A multinational population survey of intravaginal ejaculation latency time. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 2, 492-497.